Water

Saving Kathmandu

June 11, 2019  Kripendra Amatya : The houses and structures which have blocked rajkulos and canals should be shifted elsewhere

With the onset of monsoon, pictures of Kathmandu streets being waterlogged have started to surface in social media. Royal canals, called rajkulo, are blocked by infrastructures. Concrete building and blacktopped roads stop infiltration of rain in soil, causing the ponds to go dry. As water fails to enter the soil due to concrete houses and paved roads and the sewerage gets jammed due to litter, even light rains could cause spread of water on the streets in the capital city. And as the water cannot enter the soil, underground water level decreases every year and people are forced to dig deeper to extract the underground water. 

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How two Sikhs built Kathmandu’s water pipelines and laid its roads http://bit.ly/2XbrJ6J

Prawash Gautam, Kathmandu

Jun 11, 2019 : The saying goes that Sardar Manohar Singh could point to where each water pipeline had been laid under Kathmandu, and where all the valves and chambers and reducing holes were. Manohar--who came all the way to Kathmandu from Rawalpindi in 1931--knew all this for a simple reason: he had played a crucial role in laying them. And when Kathmandu started tracing networks of roads above those very pipelines, it was Manohar’s son, Sardar Hardayal Singh, who would build paths and ensured their maintenance.

Read more: How two Sikhs built Kathmandu’s water pipelines and laid its roads http://bit.ly/2XbrJ6J

DPU PhD candidate successfully defends thesis on the everyday politics of water

 

 

 

14 May 2019
Congratulations to Stephanie Butcher who has successfully defended her PhD thesis examining the ‘everyday politics of water’ and how this shaped the experience of citizenship for diverse residents of Kathmandu’s informal settlements.

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हरायो पानी जोगाउने ज्ञान

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KUKL efficacy in doubt

COMPLETION OF MELAMCHI PROJECT MAY NOT TRANSLATE TO RESPITE FROM WATER-RELATED WOES WITH DECISIONS PENDING

HIMALAYAN NEWS SERVICE
Kathmandu, November 29

Kathmandu Valley denizens hoping for an end to all their drinking water-related woes may not get the respite they hope for with the long-awaited Melamchi Drinking Water Project expected to be completed by September or October next year.
This is because some crucial decisions that need to taken through the board of Kathmandu Upatyaka Khanepani Ltd (KUKL) has been stalled since long. The public-private partnership company is the authorised body to handle the management of drinking water and waste water in the Valley.

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